Letters for March 19, 2020 | RecordCourier.com

Letters for March 19, 2020

The shelves were bare of toilet paper at a Douglas County Walmart on March 12.
Kurt Hildebrand

Not flush with TP

Editor:

Hold it, don’t throw out that catalog. I’m going to need it thanks to the selfish inconsiderate individuals out there who line up at Costco at 6 a.m., rushing the doors when they tore opens to load up their carts with toilet paper and tissues and wiping out the supplies that are needed by all Americans.

I searched high and low this weekend for toilet paper and tissues, to replenish what will be going down the drain due to a scheduled colonoscopy.

So, what do you think? Can I come over to your house and do my business since you have an overabundance of toilet paper?

Come on people. This pandemic is not all about you and your needs (wants).

Guess, I’ll have to go out and harvest some sagebrush. I’m going to need it in case I am unable to find some toilet paper and run out of catalogs.

Judy Huck-Adams

Minden

Backing Nelson, Nowosad and Gardner

Editor:

We are very blessed to have agricultural rangelands that contribute to the rural character of the Carson Valley. They are beautiful to behold. And, I think it’s safe to say, that for many of us, they provide a sense of peace and well-being.

The soil that makes up our agricultural rangelands is an incredibly valuable resource! The relationship between soil air, soil water, and microbial life (the decay process), provides the ingredients to support the growing and recycling of grasses and forage crops on these lands.

Plant cover and organic residues deposited on the soil surface capture rainfall and snow melt, enhancing the movement of water down into the soil where it falls. While this prevents erosion and the loss of valuable topsoil, this water also supplies nutrients to growing plants that nourish the cattle and wildlife that graze on them. It also feeds our aquifers. So, one could equate the maintenance and preservation of our rangelands with prudent water conservation and management.

We are witnessing a delicate balance in the soil ecosystem and the works of God in Nature at its very best. All facets of Nature are so interrelated.

As urban development expands and gobbles up treasured rangelands, I believe it is crucial, as residents of Douglas County, for us to recognize the many benefits our pristine rangelands provide, and remain attentive and persistent in our efforts to wisely preserve and manage them, not just for us but for future generations.

Those of us who are not directly involved with ranching or agricultural can still contribute to the preservation and sound management of these lands by electing county commissioners who value them and the rural ambiance they provide. We have three such individuals running for County Commissioner positions this year – Dave Nelson (for re-election), Walt Nowosad, and Mark Gardner. Please consider casting your vote for them.

Bob Russo

Gardnerville Ranchos

Solve transportation issues first

Editor:

It would be appropriate if the South Tahoe Chamber would get off their sounding board and first provide solutions to the transportation situation before expecting an event center to be constructed.

Yes, it does sound like a South Tahoe Event Center could be beneficial, though it first must attract huge numbers of people. But for that to happen, the people need to get there. Highway 50 must be improved, and that is unlikely to happen, and the South Tahoe Airport is not up to the need.

Pete Harding

Ruhenstroth

Send good thoughts to our artists

Editor:

Gina Lopez Hill is the executive director of the Brewery Arts Center in Carson City. She oversees one of the most successful arts organizations in all of Northern Nevada.

Like so many others at this time, she is experiencing a devastating downfall due to the coronavirus.

Over the last few years, through “focus” and very hard work, Gina has grown the Brewery Arts Center. Through Concerts, Plays, Comedy, Fine Art Shows, Gina has been able to provide work to hundreds of Artists on a yearly basis.

Here in our Carson Valley, we are blessed to have so many talented artists. Whether they be musicians, actors, comedians, or fine artists, our beautiful rural valley is inhabited by folks who seriously engage in the arts.

As we emerge from this current crisis, we must place a new emphasis on the arts. By staging Concerts, Live theater, comedic productions, fine art shows, we can attract new and larger audiences. We can become a “destination point,” attracting tourists who will visit and stay at our casinos and hotels, eat at our restaurants, view our wild horses, visit our Bently Distillery, and shop in our local stores. The arts can rightly serve as an important part of the economic engine’that drives the Douglas County economy.

During this time I ask that you send good thoughts and some prayers to the many artists in our beautiful valley. I’ve had many great days in Douglas County, whether it be sitting in the audience, visiting a Gallery, or enjoying a cocktail with one of our many talented Artists.

What could be better?

Onward and upward toward better times in our beautiful Valley.

Joe Hooven

Minden

Virus not Trump’s fault

Editor:

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-NY, released a joint statement on Feb. 26 on what they want to see in the funding bill to fight the coronavirus, that also included unfounded blame toward President Trump. The New York Times even called it Trump virus and their chief economist Kruger was cheering on the downturn in the stock market.

Presidential candidate Joe Biden called him a xenophobe for restricting travel to and from infected areas. Democrats believe in never let a crisis go to waste. Politicize it, even though they were neglecting it in the early stages, instead concentrating 100 percent on a phony impeachment process for the first six weeks of the year.

The genesis of the outbreak of the coronavirus can be traced to China, which has not been transparent to its origins, contributing its spread to 60 countries currently.

Trump took steps in January, banning those that have been in China recently from entering U.S. and adding later Iran, parts of Italy and South Korea. These steps are already saving lives. CNN also criticized the travel restrictions, claimed them to be racist and later made the same demands of their own employees.

Americans that are returning from China are quarantined for the 14-day estimated incubation period time for the infection symptoms can last. Current estimates are that it is little more contagious than the influenza and similar preventions are recommended for both. Government is claiming that the risk for coronavirus is low. As of March 2, 89,000 people infected worldwide, 80 confirmed cases in nine states and six dead in U.S. Comparing this to flu epidemic in U.S. in 2017-2018, with 40 million infected and approximately 60,000 deaths.

Trump has been taking steps to curb the spread of virus, besides the travel restrictions, forming a task force under leadership of Vice President Pence, requesting additional funds from Congress and asking for unified effort by all Americans to keep the damage to minimum.

Mark Tarvainen

Gardnerville