Editor’s Notepad: Genoa sisters bring the heat | RecordCourier.com

Editor’s Notepad: Genoa sisters bring the heat

Editor Kurt Hildebrand

Former Genoa resident and Douglas High School 2011 valedictorian Amelia Ritger has been offered a National Science Foundation graduate research fellowship this year.

Amelia is a 2015 graduate of Dartmouth College in life sciences and ecology.

Amelia is a straight-up, honest-to-God scientist who has done independent research on lionfish. There are a lot of entries riffing on that, such as lionfish tamer, the roar of the lionfish, so her sister Clara didn't get all of the media savvy in the family.

She appeared in a New York Times article on ants last year working in the Rockefeller University Laboratory of Insect Social Evolution.

Father Phil Ritger said she is doing genetic research in a graduate laboratory.

She spent her first year of post undergraduate work on a Reynolds Fellowship investigating invasive lionfish in Curaçao.

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Phil said she has a peer-review publication accepted regarding mercury pollutant levels in their food chain.

The National Science Foundation award and her future focus will be in marine ecology and biology.

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Amelia's sister Clara is producing short video documentaries for the Wall Street Journal's U.S.-focused Financial Inclusion video series. The series is looking at financial insecurity in America from different angles.

Clara was salutatorian at Douglas High for the graduating class of 2010.

She graduated from Notre Dame. She produced six episodes of the "The Great American Cooking Story," which was named best documentary at the Toronto and Miami web festivals.

You can check out her work at https://clararitger.com

Amelia and Clara are the daughters of Genoa residents Phil and Christine Ritger.

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On Tuesday, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension's Dr. Steve Lewis confirmed he is retiring on June 30. He told commissioners that his replacement is a priority for the university, but that so far no movement had occurred on that front.

Dr. Steve was named extension educator in the Gardnerville office in 1990.

He has served as a moderator for a variety of events, and been a trusted voice in matters of agriculture and beyond.

His background includes stints with the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management, and managing a hay farm in Eureka.

He started out with the Cooperative Extension as agent in charge in Eureka, where he was the bane of vertebrate pests, such as gophers and ground squirrels.

Kurt Hildebrand is editor of The Record-Courier. Reach him at khildebrand@recordcourier.com or 775-782-5121, ext. 21