Teens hold park ranger hostage in men’s room | RecordCourier.com
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Teens hold park ranger hostage in men’s room

by Sharon Carter

A Douglas County park ranger was held hostage by two teen-ager in a park mens room stall late Friday afternoon for as long as it took for him to radio for assistance.

According to a report in Douglas County District Court, two 16-year-olds, Robert Therres and Blake Myers, had gone into a stall in the mens restroom at Aspen Park in the Gardnerville Ranchos to divide a larger 1/8th-ounce bag of marijuana into smaller packages for disbursement, while two customers waited outside at a picnic table with the girlfriend of one of the boys.

The park ranger entered the restroom, discovered the youths’ activity and confiscated the drug. He reportedly told the boys to leave immediately or he would notify the sheriff’s office. At that point, Therres and Myers said, they hurriedly left the premises in different directions. One went by the table to get his girlfriend, telling her and the others that the ranger had confiscated the dope.

In a move Judge David Gamble described Tuesday as “just another example of how smart marijuana makes you,” the two alleged it was the other youths who attempted to seize what they perceived as a golden opportunity.

“It was those other kids that went in (while he was cleaning up) and held the ranger hostage in the toilet stall, for the marijuana,” defense attorney Tod Young said in court, bracing an imaginary stall door closed with his hands and body. “So, the ranger called the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office on his belt radio.”

Both Therres and Myers Tuesday admitted had marijuana in the restroom at 4 p.m. Friday. And, both said they had used the drug on other occasions.

According to Douglas County Sheriff’s Sergeant Lance Modispacher, juvenile probation officers believe the case to be closed with Myers’ and Therres’ admissions.

Gamble set May 25 for disposition of their cases. Until their hearings, both boys will be on house arrest. Both are to be tested for drug use until the results are “clean” or free of indications of the drug.

“I want a good, negative test,” Gamble said, “so the court will know when and if they use again.”