Full transcript of online school board debate | RecordCourier.com
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Full transcript of online school board debate

StaffdWriter:

How can a trustee of the school board actively engage students in the classroom? In other words, what are you doing to make sure students are engaged in learning?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:00 StaffdWriter



4:01



StaffdWriter:

Deadline for response: 4:08

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:01 StaffdWriter

4:06

Tom Moore:

The role of the school board is to direct the superintendent in order to ensure good instructional practices are followed. Our district has adopted a model known as Teach for Success(T4S). In the model, student engagement is one area reported on to the Board. This information from T4S is provided to the Board for our information in ensuring that the students are engaged in learning. The School Board holds the superintendent accountable for student success.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:06 Tom Moore

4:06

jeanette turnbeaugh:

As a former teacher, I know when students are actively engaged in learning, and I know that only the teacher can determine that. As a board member, I would be interested in seeing that teachers had up to date technologies, like the new Promethean boards that are being used, and that the teachers had sound curricula and materials. I know that the district uses the T4S model for classroom information, but I don’t think that is the best way. It is compared to a “snapshot” of the school on a given day, but if the school knows the time that T4S visitors are coming, it becomes more of a “school Picture Day” when everyone is dressed up and ready to smile for the camera. Teacher evaluation by administrators is a better way.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:06 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:07

StaffdWriter:

Sharla has informed us she is running a little late, so we will move on to the next question.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:07 StaffdWriter

4:07

Kurt:

Unless of course she pops up right now, no now.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:07 Kurt

4:07

StaffdWriter:

Not counting state budget cuts, what is the biggest problem facing the district that is within your control to fix, and how will you fix it?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:07 StaffdWriter

4:08

StaffdWriter:

Deadline: 4:15

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:08 StaffdWriter

4:09

Sharla Hales:

Regarding student engagement: A trustee’s main roles are to set policy (including budget and curriculum matters) and to supervise and evaluate the superintendent. Trustees can use their policy-making function to foster active engagement. For instance, Trustees have endorsed the Teach for Success (T4S) program that includes student engagement. Trustees can choose textbook and curriculum programs that include strong engagement components. Also, Trustees can make sure the budget includes resources for professional development to help teachers teach in an engaging fashion. Finally, Trustees can hold the superintendent accountable for student achievement, because we know that engaged student achieve better. She, in turn, holds administrators accountable, and they hold teachers accountable.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:09 Sharla Hales

4:09

Kurt:

Here she is.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:09 Kurt

4:11

Tom Moore:

Moving a good school district to great in the area of student achievement. This can only be accomplished through hard work. We are already very proud of the work our teachers do with our students. Keeping up that good work and increasing student achievement in the light of limited resources is a major difficulty that the Board faces. However, we are convinced that by having high expectations and providing support and materials to our teachers we can move our school district from good to great. It is not only the teachers responsibility, all of us as members of this community have the responsibility to see that our students get the best possible education.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:11 Tom Moore

4:13

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I believe that the biggest problem facing the district concerns improving relations between the staffs of various schools and the district office. We have been through a long and difficult time morale wise, as we begin the new school superintendent’s administration. I have seen our status as a district slip from being known as the “lighthouse district” and valuable programs have been discontinued, and I have long been concerned that good teachers coming to our district have not stayed in our district. I think that we need to focus most on building strong working relationships between schools and the district office, and of course with the school board.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:13 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:14

Sharla Hales:

There are rarely problems that are completely within the control of just the Trustees. In fact, I really can’t think of one. Even the budget cuts require lots of folks working together to make sure they are done with the least harm.

The biggest concern is, of course, raising student achievement, and there is no magic bullet for doing that. It requires working together, modifying and adjusting, listening, and moving forward after careful thought. It requires holding the superintendent accountable. It requires high expectations for all students.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:14 Sharla Hales

4:15

StaffdWriter:

This next question is three-pronged, so we will extend the deadline to 4:30.

How will you restore trust among teachers who feel trust was broken in the SpringBoard adoption process? How will you get those teachers to buy into the new curriculum? Do you believe teachers’ opposition to SpringBoard at the state level constituted insubordination?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:15 StaffdWriter

4:23

Tom Moore:

Teachers, employees, everyone has the right to question decisions. The Board will expect the Superintendent and principals to work with the teachers to provide them with support, training, and additional educational materials to ensure that students meet the district’s high expectations for English Language Arts. This is especially important given the new core standards coming out from the state and federal government. Supporting teachers, encouraging teachers, and providing them with positive feedback as they go through this process is going to be very important.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:23 Tom Moore

4:27

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I have been involved in textbook adoption procedures from 1972 to 2008. Never have I seen just one book put under consideration, and never have I seen teachers’ opinions so completely ignored. I attended the meeting in the district office where a committee consisting of two teachers, an administrator, a parent, and a district office person voted on this text. The sophomore committee voted no, and the junior committee was a tie vote, primarily because the teacher from Whittell had to leave. At the subsequent board meeting, the district said that if she had stayed, that one would have been a no vote as well. So trust was broken, and the board directed the district office staff to address this problem. The Spring Board curriculum has been touted as rigorous, but without literature and grammar. The teachers are simply stating that this program will not increase student achievement. It would be easy enough for the teachers to follow this program, and to do less work grading and teaching, but many of them feel that this is just wrong for the students. This program does not align with current district standards (which I helped to write some years ago) and it does not align with the Nevada state standards. There are no big surprises with the new standards coming out. The most important part of this process is giving the teachers a voice and hearing that voice, not simply voting against them. I have spoken with our new superintendent, and I am encouraged that she believes that she can help to deal with this very difficult problem.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:27 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:28

Sharla Hales:

1. All involved with the adoption of this program–teachers, administrators, board members–are people of good will who have the best interests of students at heart. All have the same goal in mind, and working toward that goal will build trust. Working together will rebuild trust.

2. I see two main ways that buy in may occur. First, the District will monitor and adjust as the District moves forward with the SpringBoard curriculum. For instance, I have heard that teachers of the 11th grade classes don’t like “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” which, as I recall, is a novel included in that grade. It has been my suggestion that our professional development staff should work with the teachers to replace that novel with one they are more excited about using. I believe similar adjustments can occur across the grade levels without taking away from the effectiveness of the program while making it more enjoyable for teachers. Second, there are some teachers in our District who opposed SpringBoard who came be avid supporters after using it for awhile. I’m optimistic that this will occur with others.

3. Perhaps, but the bigger point is that respect was given to the teachers who opposed. They were able to make their points with the State Board, and it was good for the State Board to consider all viewpoints before making the decision to approve.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:28 Sharla Hales

4:29

StaffdWriter:

We will allow 7 minutes for any rebuttal concerning the posted answers. Deadline: 4:36

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:29 StaffdWriter

4:33

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I believe the district office and the Trustees need to examine the policies for adoption of curriculum. It needs also to keep a close eye on reading scores, both ALT and HSPE (High School Proficiency Tests) I can’t see how those scores will rise by doing less reading, and by reading less difficult material. I think also, that the teachers are more knowledgeable about appropriate novels than the professional development staff is, and that grade level groups of teachers might be an appropriate way to start.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:33 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:34

Sharla Hales:

Confusion occurs on the issue of the committee’s recommendation. While some teachers may have believed that each grade’s committee vote would settle the matter for that grade, that was not the understanding of the Trustees, particularly in light of the strategic plan which calls for vertical alignment of programs from the younger grades to the older grades.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:34 Sharla Hales

4:35

jeanette turnbeaugh:

The program we had was vertically aligned from 7 through 12. And it is a mistake to say that Spring Board is the only vertically aligned program out there.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:35 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:36

Sharla Hales:

Actually, the number of challenging books read has increased in some SpringBoard classes.

The point with vertical alignment is that the Board could not honor some grades vote for SpringBoards and other against while maintaining vertical alignment.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:36 Sharla Hales

4:37

StaffdWriter:

OK, moving on to the next question.

Do you support the district’s facilities master plan? If so, which middle school should be closed in phase 2, and which elementary school should be converted to a K-8 school?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:37 StaffdWriter

4:37

StaffdWriter:

Deadline: 4:44

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:37 StaffdWriter

4:40

Sharla Hales:

I absolutely support the district’s facilities master plan. It was adopted by the Board, and I support Board decisions.

As to which middle school should be closed and which elementary converted, I have not formed an opinion. There needs to be multiple opportunities for community input on those points. I will listen carefully to constituents before making those decisions. I will also want to confer as a Board and consider staff input. Those are decisions that will require very careful listening and analysis.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:40 Sharla Hales

4:41

jeanette turnbeaugh:

It is difficult to see our student population shrinking, and having to make these decisions. I remember when Jack’s Valley was first built and sat empty for a time, and now we have Kingsbury Middle School empty. I believe that the plan (please correct me if I’m wrong) is to close CVMS. I think the middle school closest to the most student population should remain open. I am not sure I understand why one elementary school will be K-8. Am I correct in believing that the plan is to return Douglas High School to a 4 year high school?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:41 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:43

Tom Moore:

I most definitely support the District’s Facility Master Plan. We are not at the point to determine which facility should be closed or which facility should be moved to a K-8 school. All indications show a middle school may need to be closed. However, as a Board member, I’m going to be asking for a considerable amount of information and a list of pro’s and con’s before making any decisions. My current concern is with KMS sitting vacant. There needs to be a dialogue and a final plan for that property. This plan should include community input.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:43 Tom Moore

4:44

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I agree with Tom and Sharla that this will need to be thoroughly discussed with the communities involved.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:44 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:44

StaffdWriter:

A followup, deadline: 4:51

Because the middle school closure is not specified in the master plan, has the board simply deferred a difficult decision for a few years?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:44 StaffdWriter

4:46

Sharla Hales:

The beauty of the master plan is that we have a guiding document and a starting point. Now that we have this plan, we can take hard decisions one by one and focus on them, being careful to give each the full research, analysis and thought that it deserves. The decision was not deferred in avoidance, rather, it was planned all along that it would be made later after the appropriate process to give the final decision the best chance of success.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:46 Sharla Hales

4:48

jeanette turnbeaugh:

Sharla, can you tell me the time line at this point and whether the 4 year high school was correct, or am i misinformed?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:48 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:49

Sharla Hales:

You are correct. The goal is to have Douglas High School house 9-12 grades within a few years. It’s a huge project, so it takes time to set it up.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:49 Sharla Hales

4:50

Tom Moore:

Absolutely not. The Facilities Master Plan is a high level document. It was never intended to be a detailed road map. Numerous issues need to be taken into account before decisions can be made. These decisions should be made carefully, and thoughtfully with the needs of the students as the number one priority. The facilities themselves need to be analyzed for the increased student load that would take place, as well as the transportation issues that would arise. The Board needs to be comfortable with the demographics that were identified in the Facilities Master Plan.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:50 Tom Moore

4:50

jeanette turnbeaugh:

Thank you, Sharla. I do support the 4 year high school. the last 4 year class graduated in 1997, and I would enjoy participating in these decisions as we move forward.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:50 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:51

StaffdWriter:

OK, another two-pronged question, so we will extend the deadline until 5:00.

Is the school district living up to the promises it made to voters in the 2008 bond campaign? What is the single most significant bond-funded improvement completed so far and why?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:51 StaffdWriter

4:57

Tom Moore:

Yes we are. I feel it is important that we stay in contact with the members of the KIDS Committee to stay true to our committment with them. The most significant projects so far have been around health and safety, including boilers at GWHS, rekeying at the high schools, and energy efficiency projects. Additionally, parking lot lighting at the high school and improved fire alarm communication systems have been installed assuring student and faculty safety. The challenge for the district is to incorporate the remaining items identified by the KIDS Committee into the Facilities Master Plan to ensure fiscal responsibility with taxpayer dollars.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:57 Tom Moore

4:58

jeanette turnbeaugh:

Thank you Tom, I wasn’t sure about what had been done. At the last board meeting, I heard about plans being made to change from the design, bid, build model to a new system with a more collaborative approach, and I know there are two big projects in the works, one at Pinon Hills. Are these funded by the 2008 bond campaign?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:58 jeanette turnbeaugh

4:59

Sharla Hales:

Yes, the school district is living up to the promises it made. When the facilities master plan was prepared, it was done in conjunction with the list of priorities prepared by the KIDS committee. That list is frequently consulted as the district lines up available funds with the most pressing needs to make facilities decisions.

Many of the most significant bond-funded improvements are just now beginning, such as major improvements to Gardnerville Elementary and an added wing at Pinion Hills Elementary.

Some important projects that are already completed centered around urgent needs, such as fire alarm system replacements at Douglas and Whittell. Also, an HVAC replacement at Whittell is completed, as are fan coil replacements at several schools. The district is currently working through re-key project, which was a top KIDS Committee recommendation.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 4:59 Sharla Hales

5:00

StaffdWriter:

Next question. Deadline: 5:07.

What have you done or what will you do to meet the needs of those students no longer served by Sierra Crest Academy?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:00 StaffdWriter

5:00

jeanette turnbeaugh:

At one point, I heard that there were some problems in getting bids for the rekeying projects, so hopefully those will be completed soon

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:00 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:04

Tom Moore:

I understand many of the Sierra Crest students have enrolled in Douglas High School and others have enrolled in ASPIRE. I also understand that the district has worked closely with the parents of students involved to provide them with options within the district. It is my hope that we will continue to provide students with the options they need to become successful.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:04 Tom Moore

5:05

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I attended the sessions when the Sierra Crest Academy asked for the district support in keeping it open, and I know that was a difficult decision to make. I know that the parents mentioned home schooling options, and that the Silver State Online Academy was one place that some of these students went. I am not sure how many returned to Douglas High School, but I gathered at the meeting that most did not feel that was an option. If there are those back at the middle or high school, those students will need the support of the teachers and counselors to be successful.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:05 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:05

Sharla Hales:

Regarding the short term view, Board members directed staff to reach out to students who attended Sierra Crest Academy to make sure that they were informed of all their options, warmly invited to enroll in Douglas schools, and told of the support that would be extended to them.

Regarding the long term view, I have been an advocate for ASPIRE, our alternative school. I will continue to push for more resources to broaden the options that are available through ASPIRE. At the last Board meeting, I asked that staff prepare a status report and bring it to us soon so that we can make sure we are doing all we possibly can to support that school which serves students who find more success in a non-traditional setting. I am excited about the possibilities and look forward to creating more opportunities for students.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:05 Sharla Hales

5:06

StaffdWriter:

Incoming question from “David.” Deadline will be 5:24

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:06 StaffdWriter

5:06

[Comment From David David : ]

I believe it is very important for students and people to read and appreciate and fully realize arguments and works. Currently, all forms of communications are being being shortened to “bites’ and excerpts. Can you tell me how adopting a program that removes full length works in favor of excerpts gives a student a better education?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:06 David

5:06

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I agree that an alternative school is necessary, and we have had several versions before ASPIRE. I hope that we can create those opportunites

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:06 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:07

StaffdWriter:

Deadline will be 5:14. Sorry about that.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:07 StaffdWriter

5:10

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I agree with you David. In the past we had a strand about Greek literature starting with mythology and ending in the tragedies of Sophocles. We covered all literary genres, from plays, essays, poetry, and novels. We worked to make sure materials were grade appropriate and not repeated. American literature was stressed in 11th grade and world literature was stressed in 12th. In the District competencies, students in high school were to read 500 pages on their own.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:10 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:11

Tom Moore:

I assume you are referring to our new English curriculum. It doesn’t eliminate the opportunity for students to appreciate full length works. However, it does use excerpts in order to teach specific skills. It is unfortunate that one of the misconceptions about this program is that it eliminates the use of full length novels. Teachers still have the opportunity to supplement the program with literature they feel is important for the students to read.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:11 Tom Moore

5:11

Sharla Hales:

SpringBoard does use excerpts, but it does not do so at the expense of full length works. Both are useful and important.

In just one SpringBoard class I am familiar with, the students read more full-length, challenging books than they did before the SpringBoard program was used.

The excerpts are useful because they can be used to teach a concept. Then when students have a full understanding of that concept, they are ready for more challenging full length works. For instance, a Disney hero may be used to introduce the concept of what a hero is, and what characteristics a hero may have. Then a full length piece of Greek literature could be read. The students would understand the more challenging piece because they had used an excerpt to gain an understanding of a concept.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:11 Sharla Hales

5:13

StaffdWriter:

OK, this next question comes from “CV Mom.” Deadline will be 5:20.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:13 StaffdWriter

5:13

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I am curious why Spring Board didn’t put those full length works in to begin with. As I watch my nephew’s reading last year as a 10th grader and this year as an 11th grader, I know he is not reading more

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:13 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:13

[Comment From CV Mom CV Mom : ]

What will you do as a trustee to assure that the disconnect between high achieving students and low achieving students can be mended?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:13 CV Mom

5:18

jeanette turnbeaugh:

There can be a number of reasons why low achieving students have problems. If it is a knowledge gap, those students need more and special scaffolding. I was pleased to hear that at Whittell, and at Zephyr Cove, special funding and programs have been put in place for just that reason. If other reasons are involved, then they need to be addressed. We can’t just keep saying we need more rigor, while our scores go down and children fall through the cracks. I read last week that only 25% of the students in Nevada meet the scores on the ACT to get into regular classes in college. Education can be a hard sell these days, and sometimes students and parents need to also take more responsibility and effort, and sometimes the school needs to provide more support with extra time and with diagnosing specific deficiencies.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:18 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:19

Tom Moore:

I am not quite sure of the meaning of your question. However, I support a full range or educational opportunities for all of our students. This includes meeting the needs of those who are college bound, as well as those who are looking for other avenues of employment. No matter what your future plans are the basic skills of reading, writing, and arithmatic, along with good communication skills are absolutely essential to survive in today’s society. Our job as Board members is to make sure the needs of all students are met recognizing that each student is his/her own unique individual.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:19 Tom Moore

5:19

Sharla Hales:

It is important that all students feel they are a valued part of the school, and it is important that all students receive an education that challenges, but doesn’t overwhelm, them.

Trustees have committed resources to professional development to help teachers have skills to reach all students, whether high achieving or low achieving.

One step we took as a Board was to open enrollment to AP classes. We believe that all students should have resources to stretch and enrich their education, no matter what level they are currently working at.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:19 Sharla Hales

5:21

StaffdWriter:

Next question. Deadline 5:28.

What is your opinion of No Child Left Behind?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:21 StaffdWriter

5:21

Sharla Hales:

I will continue to support the Board Intervention Funds which I suggested the Board use to allow all school sites to support struggling students.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:21 Sharla Hales

5:21

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I disagree Sharla, about the AP classes. would you recommend all students take AP calculus? Sometimes you are telling students to bring a knife to a gunfight. I agree that all students should challenge themselves, but as more students take AP the colleges are simply raising the scores that they will grant credit on.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:21 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:26

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I feel that NCLB has proven disastrous, and some call it All Schools Left Behind. I recently read an article by Linda Darling-Hammond, an education professor at Stanford showing how Finland, has made it to the top of the international rankings after it emerged from the USSR and is now first among the OECD nations (European developed nations) despite a large population of immigrants speaking more than 60 languages. Finland has done just the opposite of what we have been doing. There is a lean core curriculum, no external testing, and strong local control and teacher empowerment.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:26 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:28

Tom Moore:

In the basic context, it was a good idea. Holding school districts accountable for increasing student achievement is something I fully support. The problem is that bureaucracy was woven into the requirements of No Child Left Behind. There needs to be the ability to gauge the success of the students, as well as the schools and districts. An example would be by measuring student growth from year to year, rather than on arbitrarily set achievement bars. This has created a problem nationwide with school districts. Student achievement should always be the Board’s highest priority. No Child Left Behind was about student achievement. It is my hope that for the future that measurement could be based upon student growth from year to year.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:28 Tom Moore

5:28

Sharla Hales:

No Child Left Behind has helped in some ways, but there are very troublesome aspects.

NCLB has resulted in all school districts using data better and focusing on individual students. However, troublesome aspects of NCLB are just unworkable, such as the expectation that all students will be proficient by 2012 and the labels placed on schools sometimes when just one or two students fail to take a test or make a certain score. One strong objection I have to NCLB is that it does not concern high achieving students. Since NCLB, less attention has been paid to the needs of high achievers.

By the way, I’m against gunfights and knife fights. Ha Ha.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:28 Sharla Hales

5:29

StaffdWriter:

Next question. Deadline: 5:36.

“Common core standards” is the new buzz phrase in education. Do you believe the federal government should dictate content in the classroom?

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:29 StaffdWriter

5:29

jeanette turnbeaugh:

Me too>)

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:29 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:33

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I believe that those standards should be short and clear, and that local districts could build around those to determine how these should be taught. I don’t believe that all students should be taking the same semester tests and that teachers should be lock step all on the same page. The teachers collect data on a daily basis, and that information is not considered as important as a test from some testing company. For example Northwest Labs was hired to prepare our ALTs in language, and teachers came to choose from question banks. They had many mistakes in the language test, and ended up hiring me to proofread it.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:33 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:34

Tom Moore:

I believe in local control for education. The reality is that the federal government is expecting these standards. There is a part of me that recognizes having common standards throughout the nation allows for better comparisons of student achievement between schools and districts. Without the ability to judge or recognize success of one school compared to the other you are diminishing your ability to direct progress within your school. It is my hope that in light of the reality of common standards we will still have local control as to how we achieve the standards.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:34 Tom Moore

5:35

Sharla Hales:

You asked whether I believe the federal government should dictate content in the classroom. My answer: no. I believe passionately in local control. That is why I filed to be a candidate in hopes of continuing my time-consuming commitment to local control of Douglas County School District where students, parents and community members can speak directly to Trustees and decisions can be made that work in this community.

By the way, my understanding is that the “Common Core” has been adopted by over 30 states. It was instigated by the Governors’ Association, so technically it is not driven by the federal government.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:35 Sharla Hales

5:35

StaffdWriter:

OK, we are going to allow a rebuttal and followup period for any questions or answers already posted, during which the three candidates can openly converse. The period will extend until 5:45, then each candidate will have 10 minutes to prepare closing statements, which must be posted before 5:55.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:35 StaffdWriter

5:43

jeanette turnbeaugh:

I would like to thank the Record Courier, Sharla and Tom for this opportunity to discuss some of the issues involved. I served for 4 years on the Alpine County School Board as a Trustee, so I know and appreciate the time and effort our Trustees have devoted to their jobs. Our schools and our students are the most important assets a community has, and I know we all want the best for them. I would like the opportunity to serve on this board and work for our students.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:43 jeanette turnbeaugh

5:44

StaffdWriter:

Assuming no one has anything more to add, we will now move on to closing statements. Each candidate will have until 5:55 to post their concluding statements for the night.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:44 StaffdWriter

5:46

Tom Moore:

My thanks to the Record Courier for giving all of us this opportunity. Thank you to Jeannie and Sharla for their participation.

I believe in providing a foundation for student success; accountability throughout the school district; community involvement in public education; support for advanced curriculum and career and technical training; and fiscal responsibility.

Community involvement is vital for the District as evidenced by the KIDS Committee continuation bond. The key to student success is a combined effort made up of parents, schools, and the community as a whole. Money does not solve problems, hard work does. I strongly believe every student graduating from high school should be able to function successfully in society. Our schools need to support and foster all levels of education. The need exists for advanced curriculum and career and technical education for our students. Sacrifice and hard work will assure that our students receive the best education in the nation in these difficult times.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:46 Tom Moore

5:49

Sharla Hales:

I appreciate the opportunity that this debate presented for us to share views with the community. Thank you to the Record Courier and to Jeanne and Tom.

Education brings success. Students need to graduate with skills ready to succeed in college, vocational training, or career. In this economic downturn, education is the hope that every young person can hold to and every parent encourage as the best means to financial security in the future. Education brings options and hope to individual young people. It also brings options and hope to Douglas County as our community reaches towards economic diversification.

Students rise to meet high expectations. All students need rigorous, relevant work that challenges them. Gifted and talented programs, honors courses and Advanced Placement programs are all critical to meeting the needs of students. Extra support is also critical for those students who are struggling.

Adults also rise to meet high expectations. School district evaluation systems should hold every tax-payer funded employee accountable for providing excellent services to students. Teacher and administrator evaluations should include measures of achievement of their students.

Art, music and P.E. are important to a balanced education. Career and technical education is critical as it increases student achievement, graduation rate, and career readiness.

My experience, qualifications and skills will help our students achieve success.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:49 Sharla Hales

5:55

StaffdWriter:

Well, I think that wraps it up. The Record-Courier would like to thank the three school board candidates for participating tonight, and those community members who joined in. This concludes our series of online town hall forums. All transcripts can be viewed on our Web site. Thanks again, and happy voting.

Wednesday October 20, 2010 5:55 StaffdWriter