Douglas High students fare well in college testing | RecordCourier.com

Douglas High students fare well in college testing

by Scott Neuffer

In 2007, students in Nevada averaged a lower score on the Scholastic Aptitude Test than the nation. However, students of Douglas County scored higher than both the state and nation, according to data recently released by the Douglas County School District.

“Overall, our students do very well on the test,” said director of testing, assessments and grants Brian Frazier, who presented the data in a school board meeting Oct. 9.

According to test results from 2007, the average score nation-wide was 502 out of 800 in critical reading and verbal comparison, 515 out of 800 in math, and 494 out of 800 for writing, totaling an average composite score of 1,511 out of 2,400.

The same data showed that students in Nevada scored on average 500 in critical reading and verbal comparison, 506 in math, and 480 in writing, totaling an average composite score of 1,486.

In comparison, students of Douglas and Whittell high schools scored on average 524 in critical reading and verbal comparison, 537 in math, and 512 in writing. Douglas students’ average composite score was 1,573.

“But also look at the increase in participation. More students are interested in going to college,” said Frazier.

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Frazier said the percent of eligible seniors taking the test increased from 28 percent in 2006 to 37.9 percent this year, for a total of 164 students. At Douglas High, 119 students took the test, or 32 percent of eligible seniors, compared to 24 percent in 2006. At Whittell High, 45 students took the test, or 75 percent of eligible seniors, compared to 64.7 percent in 2006.

“Kudos to both principals, Marty Swisher and Sue Shannon,” said Frazier. “They’ve been encouraging their students to take the test.”

The SAT was changed in 2005. Added to the test was a new 800-point writing section, new math content and shorter reading passages. Absent in the new version were the analogies and quantitative comparisons that had long characterized the test.

“This is a real testament to the quality of our students and instructors,” said Douglas High principal Marty Swisher.