Douglas County, Carson Valley Conservation District and Aspen Mobile Home Park install TrapBags for flood protection | RecordCourier.com

Douglas County, Carson Valley Conservation District and Aspen Mobile Home Park install TrapBags for flood protection

Staff report

Douglas County, in collaboration with the Carson Valley Conservation District and Aspen Mobile Home Park, contracted with F & B Construction to install 600 feet of temporary barrier called "TrapBag" along the East Fork of the Carson River. TrapBags are essentially oversized sandbags which can be rapidly installed in anticipation of flooding.

This stretch of river overtops its banks when flows reach approximately 6,500 cubic feet per second. On the morning of May 5, 2017 flows on the Carson River approached 5,000 cubic feet per second causing Douglas County and the Carson Valley Conservation District to be concerned. Portions of the natural bank protecting the park were eroded away during the previous flood events increasing the likelihood of flooding during the snowmelt.

"A grant to the United States Soil Conservation Service has been submitted to restore the banks to their pre-flood condition," stated Erik Nilssen, Douglas County Engineer. "However, until a permanent solution can be installed, this temporary measure should help the residents during the spring runoff."

The Carson Valley Conservation District contacted the TrapBag manufacturers to develop a schedule and fee for the project. The County contributed $25,000 with the Aspen Mobile Home Association contributing $5,000. Local contractor F&B Construction made crews available for quick installation. After the flood threat has passed the TrapBags can be moved to other locations for future flooding mitigation.

TrapBags act as a temporary levee extending the banks of the river vertically to keep water in the river channel. The current installation raises the river bank four feet. This portion of the Carson River has been the first to see floodwaters over top its banks during the previous January and February flood events.

For more information on the Trap Bag product visit http://www.trapbag.com.