Douglas adds two more cases to coronavirus roster | RecordCourier.com
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Douglas adds two more cases to coronavirus roster

Staff Reports

Two Douglas men in their 70s, one with a connection to a previous case and one without, were reported to have come down with the coronavirus on Friday evening.

Eleven new cases across four counties were reported by Carson City Health and Human Services, which serves as the public health officer for Douglas, Lyon and Storey counties in addition to the capital.

On Friday the number of hospitalizations went up to 13. The agency doesn’t report which county hospitalized patients are from for privacy reasons.

Friday marked the first time the four counties had more than 100 active cases. Douglas has 22 of the 105 active cases across the four counties.

The Carson health agency issues its report at 6 p.m. every day. On Wednesday, a Douglas man in his 60s with a connection with a previous coronavirus case became the 70th Douglas resident to have the virus.

No Douglas deaths have been reported as a result of the virus.

A COVID-19 hotline is taking a break for the Fourth today, but will be back Monday morning at (775) 283-4789. The phone line is available 8 a.m to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

For updates and information on the virus, visit https://gethealthycarsoncity.org/novel-coronavirus-2019/

On Thursday, the Nevada Division of Industrial Relations Occupation Safety and Health Administration reported it conducted 652 initial field observations to see how many businesses are complying with the governor’s mask order.

Businesses found not in compliance are provided a written notice and request for voluntary compliance. Of the 347 businesses observed on July 1, 79.8 percent were in compliance with the mandate. Businesses in Northern Nevada have a cumulative compliance rate of 84.3 percent, while businesses in Southern Nevada were found to have a 75 percent compliance rate. Officials note that the highest rates of noncompliance are being observed in bars and national brand retail stores.

Under the directive, employers must:

■ Provide face coverings for employees assigned to serving the public and require these employees to wear the face coverings;

Require employees to wear a face covering in any area where food is prepared or packaged;

■ Mandate the use of face coverings by patrons, customers, patients, and clients and will notify them of this requirement prior to entry into the establishment.

Observations have been conducted in gaming establishments, bars, gyms, hair and nail salons, automobile sales and maintenance establishments, grocery stores, home improvement stores, clothing stores and other locations where large groups of people may be congregating for longer periods of time, which can lead to a heightened risk of spreading COVID-19.

If a business remains out of compliance in a follow-up, officials can issue a citation with a maximum penalty of $134,940 for an employer willfully violating the provisions of the directive. If the employer is observed to be in compliance during the follow-up visit, the inspection will be closed with no further action necessary.

Additionally, Nevada OSHA continues to conduct ongoing compliance enforcement activity in response to complaints and referrals received by their offices related to Updated Nevada OSHA Guidance for Businesses Operating in Phase 2 of Nevada United: Roadmap to Recovery Plan published on June 26. This guidance contains employer requirements for encouraging proper hand hygiene, cleaning and disinfection, and social distancing.

Also on Thursday, the Federal Emergency Management Agency approved $1.1 million to reimburse the State of Nevada for the purchase of Personal Protective Equipment to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect the health and safety of state, county, and tribal personnel, healthcare facility workers, and first responders.

Funds covered the acquisition of more than 2 million pieces, including N95 and surgical masks, gloves, face shields, and hand sanitizer.

The $1.5 million project is financed by $1.1 million from FEMA’s Public Assistance program, with nonfederal sources paying the remaining $400,000.