Douglas taxable sales increase 4.6 percent | RecordCourier.com

Douglas taxable sales increase 4.6 percent

Geoff Dornan
gdornan@nevadaappeal.com

Douglas County's taxable sales increased 4.6 percent in September compared to 2017.

In Tuesday's report, total sales for Douglas were $71.2 million. While far from the county's largest categories, auto sales turned in a 36 percent increase to a bit over $4 million and building material sales a 5.2 percent increase to $4.25 million. Amusement, Gambling and Recreation contributed a 40.7 percent increase to $2.9 million.

Those and other gains in smaller categories in Douglas helped offset the decrease n the county's largest tax generator, Food Services and Drinking Places — primarily the south shore resorts at Lake Tahoe. In September, taxable sales in that category fell 24 percent to $12.3 million.

Statewide September's taxable sales increased 2.5 percent to a total of $5.07 billion.

Taxation Director Bill Anderson said that is the 99th consecutive month of increases over the same month a year ago.

Statewide, Anderson said sales are up 5 percent for the first quarter of Fiscal 2019. He said just five categories account for more than half of all taxable sales in July, August and September. Because of the resorts in Southern Nevada, Food Services and Drinking Places claimed the largest share followed by auto sales. Those two categories alone accounted for $4.73 billion of the total $15.1 billion in sales.

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Carson City reported a 5.8 percent increase — more than double that of the state — to a total of $104.3 million. That number was driven by the 10.4 percent increase in auto sales, the capital's largest taxable sales generator. Car dealers sold $31.3 million worth of vehicles during the month.

Building Material sales also had a banner month, reporting $12.6 million in sales, a 12.7 percent increase.

In all, 14 of Nevada's 17 counties reported gains over the first quarter of last year. Eight rural counties grew in double digits through that period.