Man held for trial in coercion case | RecordCourier.com

Man held for trial in coercion case

A former Gardnerville resident who evaded attempts to arrest him for six months was bound over for trial on charges of failure to appear, being an ex-felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a sawed off shotgun and coercion. David Gomez, 32, appeared in Douglas County District Court on Tuesday for a continued arraignment, where District Judge Tod Young set a June 24 hearing date for the arraignment to coincide with the arraignment set Friday by Justice of the Peace Tom Perkins after a preliminary hearing. Charges were dismissed against Gomez's sister Juana, who was accused of harboring Gomez at her Ruhenstroth home. Under a deal with prosecutors, Juana Gomez will testify truthfully in any proceedings involving her brother. Officers raided the Gomez property after receiving a tip that Gomez was hiding in an outbuilding. A Washoe Tribal Police sergeant who participated in the search testified he found a sawed-off shotgun, a handgun and video cameras set up around a trailer. There was still smoke coming from a stove inside the trailer when officers arrived at the scene. Gomez's most recent troubles started in May 2013 when he ran from officers trying to serve an arrest warrant for probation violation. He was taken into custody with 27.9 grams of methamphetamine, empty plastic bags, a switchblade, a pay notebook and $457 cash. He had been out of prison for six months when that arrest occurred. He was scheduled to be arraigned on Oct. 1, 2013, on the drug charges. He came to the courthouse where he signed a plea agreement, but just before he was due to appear, he said he had a family emergency and left. Had Gomez remained in court he faced 5-20 years in prison. He is facing a habitual felon enhancement should he be convicted of the original charges. Gomez's most recent prison term was 3 ½ years for drugs.

Gomez held in Douglas jail without bail

Six months after ex-felon David Gomez slipped out of the courthouse prior to arraignment, he was back in Douglas County Jail, held without bail. Gomez, 31, was returned to Douglas County this week following his arrest March 21 in Antioch, Calif. He appeared Wednesday before East Fork Judge Tom Perkins on new felony charges of ex-felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a short-barreled shotgun and coercion, along with multiple misdemeanor charges. He told Perkins he had his own lawyer, but couldn't remember the man's name. Perkins set his next hearing for April 9. Gomez declined to sign paperwork acknowledging he understood his rights or was willing to waive a speedy hearing. He questioned the judge why charges wouldn't be heard by the Washoe Tribal court that signed the complaint filed by Douglas County. "If you have an attorney, he can argue on your behalf," Perkins said. Gomez is to appear April 15 before District Judge Tod Young, where the defendant was headed before he disappeared Oct. 1, 2013. Gomez, free on bail at the time, was set to plead guilty to multiple charges that could mean life in prison, but he left the courthouse moments before his 9 a.m. arraignment, leaving behind his pregnant fiancée. Gomez told his then-attorney, Jamie Henry, he had a family emergency, but would be back. Prosecutor Laurie Trotter asked that a warrant be issued immediately, but Senior Judge Charles McGee gave Gomez a six-hour window, issuing the warrant at 3 p.m. Trotter had filed a motion in September that Gomez's bail be increased from $28,774 because she alleged he was an "extreme flight risk." Henry filed an opposing motion arguing that her client, who had been out on bail for a week at the time, kept in contact with the Department of Alternative Sentencing, and tested negative. She said he needed to be out of custody to support his fiancée, who had health issues complicating her pregnancy. Young declined to increase Gomez's bail. Gomez's older charges include trafficking in a controlled substance, being an habitual felon, and possession of a dangerous weapon. He was arrested in May 2013, after he ran from deputies trying to serve a warrant for a probation violation. When he was taken into custody, deputies reportedly found 27.9 grams of methamphetamine, empty plastic bags, a switchblade, a pay notebook and $457. Gomez has a lengthy criminal history and multiple failures to appear. He spent 3-1/2 years in prison before being released in November 2012. Gomez has served two prior prison terms for selling methamphetamine, and eluding a peace officer who believed Gomez was trying to run him over with a van. Gomez's sister, Juana, is facing charges of aiding and abetting her brother. She is accused of providing David Gomez with a place to stay on her family property. When deputies responded Dec. 9, 2013, to a 911 hang-up from her residence, they discovered what they believed to be her brother's living quarters, outfitted with a surveillance system, computer and containing weapons and drug paraphernalia. David Gomez was not there. The charges filed against him this week allege that he battered his sister in December, and knocked her cell phone out of her hands as she attempted to call 911. He is also charged with three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia in addition to the felonies.

Gomez set for another hearing

Ex-felon David Gomez said he expected to retain a lawyer who would be able to appear on his behalf at a hearing Friday. Gomez, 31, is being held in Douglas County Jail without bail on multiple charges six months after he failed to appear for a hearing. He appeared Wednesday before East Fork Judge Tom Perkins in a video arraignment from jail. Gomez's most recent felony charges are ex-felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a short-barreled shotgun and coercion, along with multiple misdemeanor charges. Gomez is to appear Tuesday before District Judge Tod Young, where the defendant was headed before he disappeared Oct. 1, 2013. Gomez, free on bail at the time, was set to plead guilty to multiple charges that could mean life in prison, but he left the courthouse moments before his 9 a.m. arraignment, leaving behind his pregnant fiancée. He was arrested March 21 in Antioch, Calif., after a police dog bit him as he attempted to elude capture. Gomez's older charges include trafficking in a controlled substance, being an habitual felon, and possession of a dangerous weapon. He was arrested in May 2013, after he tried to run from deputies trying to serve a warrant for a probation violation. When he was taken into custody, deputies reportedly found 27.9 grams of methamphetamine, empty plastic bags, a switchblade, a pay notebook and $457. Gomez has a lengthy criminal history and multiple failures to appear. He spent 3-1/2 years in prison before being released in November 2012. Gomez has served two prior prison terms for selling methamphetamine, and eluding a peace officer who believed Gomez was trying to run him over with a van. Gomez's sister, Juana, is facing charges of aiding and abetting her brother. She is accused of providing David Gomez with a place to stay on her family property. When deputies responded Dec. 9, 2013, to a 911 hang-up from her residence, they discovered what they believed to be her brother's living quarters, outfitted with a surveillance system, computer and containing weapons and drug paraphernalia. David Gomez was not there. The charges filed against him last week allege that he battered his sister in December, and knocked her cell phone out of her hands as she attempted to call 911. He is also charged with three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia in addition to the felonies.

Warrant issued when defendant fails to show up for court

A bench warrant was issued Tuesday for a Gardnerville man, set to plead guilty to multiple charges that could mean up to life in prison, who slipped out of the courthouse moments before his arraignment, leaving behind his pregnant fiancée. Senior Judge Charles McGee issued the warrant for the arrest of David Gabriel Gomez, 31, when he failed to show up in court by a 3 p.m. deadline Tuesday. He is to be held without bail. According to Gomez's attorney, Jamie Henry, her client showed up for court at 8 a.m. Tuesday, and signed a plea agreement with the district attorney's office. Shortly before the start of court at 9 a.m., she said Gomez told her he had a family emergency, but would be back. Gomez's fiancée, Chanté Firefox, said the defendant's father had been injured in an accident at a Gardnerville ranch where he worked, and Gomez went to the scene. She said he didn't have a cell phone. McGee agreed to continue the case until 3 p.m. Tuesday, over the objection of prosecutor Laurie Trotter who asked that a warrant be issued immediately. "He is an extreme flight risk," Trotter said. "He routinely flees from police, and puts officers and himself at risk." She said if Gomez is convicted of the most recent charges, it would be his fifth felony. "He has been in prison three times," she said. "This is what he does." He is charged with trafficking in a controlled substance, being an habitual felon, and possession of a dangerous weapon. Gomez had been in custody since his arrest on May 22, but bailed out Sept. 24. His bail was $28,774 bondable. Henry said after Gomez bailed out, he immediately reported to the Department of Alternative Sentencing for supervision. She said he had all negative tests for substance use, and appeared at 8 a.m. Tuesday as she requested. "He was here literally minutes before court started," Henry said. Gomez was arrested in May after he ran from deputies trying to serve a warrant for a probation violation. When he was taken into custody, deputies reportedly found 27.9 grams of methamphetamine, empty plastic bags, a switchblade, a pay notebook and $457. East Fork Justice Tom Perkins ordered Gomez to serve the remainder of a six-month sentence for domestic battery against his fiancée last year. He denied striking the victim, but admitted they argued loud enough to draw the attention of witnesses who alleged physical abuse. Gomez has a lengthy criminal history and multiple failures to appear. He spent 3-1/2 years in prison before being released last November. Gomez has served two prior prison terms for selling methamphetamine, and eluding a peace officer who believed Gomez was trying to run him over with a van. As a result of Gomez's failure to appear Tuesday, the state is free to withdraw from the plea agreement. Charges that were going to be dismissed included battery by a probationer. Trotter said the state was free to seek a higher habitual criminal enhancement that could mean life in prison without the possibility of parole. As part of the plea agreement, Gomez had agreed to seek the lesser enhancement which was 5-20 years in prison. The higher enhancement ranges from a definite term of 25 years with eligibility after a minimum of 10; 10-to-life; and life without possibility of parole. Trotter said it is up to the judge whether to impose the habitual felon enhancement. Gomez is not eligible for probation.

Habitual felon David Gomez gets 25-year sentence

A Gardnerville man was sentenced Tuesday to a maximum of a quarter century in prison for drug trafficking and being a habitual criminal. David Gomez, 32, will have to serve a minimum of nine years before he is eligible for parole after he was sentenced by Douglas County District Court Judge Tod Young. Gomez pleaded guilty to trafficking and being an ex-felon in possession of a firearm. Other charges against him were dismissed. Gomez said he didn't want to make excuses for his behavior, but that he believed he was as much a victim of his addiction as anyone else. "Drugs were the result of the poor decisions I've made in my life," he said. "I've been an addict, a drug dealer, an outlaw and a thug in my life. But I've spent the last seven months in isolation with a Bible. My only time clean and sober has been when I was in jail or prison. I hope to come out of prison to be a better person, a better father to my children and a better brother to my sisters." In sentencing Gomez, Young said he was his own best tool to get better. "The first tool you have is you," Young said. "You've lived your life as a blight on this community. You can't rely on God to change you. It's a matter of you changing you." Seven people wrote letters in support of Gomez, including many of his family members. Young found that it was just and proper that Gomez be sentenced as a habitual criminal. Prosecutor Tom Gregory entered four prior felonies, that Young confirmed were constitutionally valid. Gomez was given credit for 334 days time served, including the last seven months since he was arrested in California after absconding before he was to appear in district court on the trafficking charge. This will be Gomez's third time in prison. He was convicted and sentenced to 1-4 years in prison in March 2006 for selling methamphetamine. In December 2008, he was sentenced to up to six years for eluding an officer. Gomez had been out of prison for six months in May 2013 when he ran from officers trying to serve an arrest warrant for a probation violation. He was captured with 27.9 grams of methamphetamine, empty plastic bags, a switchblade, a pay notebook and $457 cash. He was scheduled to be arraigned Oct. 1, 2013, on the trafficking charge. He came to the courthouse where he signed a plea agreement, but left the courthouse before his arraignment. He was on the run for six months before he was captured on March 21 in Antioch, Calif. During that time he was reportedly spotted by law enforcement riding a dirtbike between Ruhenstroth and California. Officers raided his family's Ruhenstroth home on Feb. 20 looking for him, finding a sawed-off shotgun and an identity card belonging to Gomez. A charge of harboring him was dismissed against his sister in exchange for her truthful testimony. Gomez later admitted the possession of a deadly weapon charge. Gomez was remanded to the custody of the Nevada Department of Corrections. He was convicted of the lesser habitual felon charge, which doesn't carry a life sentence.

Gomez attorney seeks global resolution

Criminal proceedings against ex-fugitive David Gomez have been continued for one month while his attorney seeks a global resolution of multiple charges facing the 31-year-old Gardnerville man. Attorney Dennis Cameron asked East Fork Judge Tom Perkins for the delay Wednesday while he negotiates charges against his client pending in justice court and district court. On Tuesday, District Judge Tod Young continued proceedings until May 20. Gomez, being held in Douglas County Jail without bail, faces district court charges of trafficking in a controlled substance, being a habitual felon, and possession of a dangerous weapon. He appeared in justice court on new felony charges of ex-felon in possession of a firearm, possession of a short-barreled shotgun and coercion, along with multiple misdemeanor charges including domestic battery and possession of drug paraphernalia. Perkins set his next justice court appearance May 28. Gomez was to appear Oct. 1, 2013, in district court when he left the courthouse prior to arraignment. He was arrested March 21 in Antioch, Calf., after he was bitten by a police dog as he attempted to elude capture. Cameron, a Reno attorney, said he had recently been retained by Gomez's family. Gomez has a lengthy criminal history and multiple failures to appear. He spent 3-1/2 years in prison before being released in November 2012. Gomez has served two prior prison terms for selling methamphetamine, and eluding a peace officer who believed Gomez was trying to run him over with a van. When deputies responded Dec. 9, 2013, to a 911 hang-up from a family member's residence, they discovered what they believed to be Gomez's living quarters, outfitted with a surveillance system, computer and containing weapons and drug paraphernalia. David Gomez was not there. The charges filed against him allege that he battered his sister in December, and knocked her cell phone out of her hands as she attempted to call 911. He is also charged with three counts of possession of drug paraphernalia in addition to the felonies.

Girls’ Golf: Wurster wins third league tournament

STATELINE – Even though Bethany Wurster represents Douglas High School and Alexis Holmes plays for South Tahoe High, they are more like golf teammates. As good “teammates” do, Wurster and Holmes root for one aonother and inspire each other. For two of the top golfers in the Sierra Division, and the state for that matter, a friendship has formed out of competition. “It will fuel you to strive for something better. You just want to beat them. You love them, but you want to beat them at the same time,” Wurster said Tuesday afternoon following a 3-over-par round of 75 that topped the Sierra Division event at Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course. “It’s kind of like, ‘Oh, I hope you do well, but I hope I do better.’” Wurster, who birdied six holes, finished seven strokes ahead of Holmes, who came in third with an 82. The last of Wurster’s birdies on No. 18 cost Holmes a dinner. “Once I get my scoring figured out, it’s going to be fun,” said Holmes, who believes mismanagement of her game at times prevents her from scoring in the 70s. “I’m driving the ball really well, but I’m just hitting bad irons. I overcompenstate sometimes when I shouldn’t, so I’m 20 yards long, and it’s very difficult to two-putt from there. “Hopefully by zone I’ll get it figured out.” The two friends played Edgewood Tahoe on Sunday in preparation for Tuesday’s round, and Wurster beat Holmes 74-76 by eagling the final hole. Bishop Manogue’s Mackenzie Souers broke up the 1-2 Wurster-Holmes finish by shooting an 80. Alex Phillips, the defending state champion and also playing in the group with Wurster and Holmes, came in fifth with an 85. “It’s the first time all three have played together,” said STHS coach Marsha Butler. “Bethany and Alexis have developed a really good friendship, but they are always real competitive with each other.” Manogue, the defending state champions, were far superior than their division foes on Tuesday, as four Miners scored 90 or better en route to a 339 team total. Damonte Ranch was second with 419 strokes and Galena and Carson tied for third at 422. South Tahoe, which placed third in the previous tournament, finished sixth at 458. The Vikings’ Morgan Murphy shot 109 and Brittany Rumble fired a 118. Team scores 1. Manogue 439, 2. Damonte Ranch 419, 3. Galena 422, 3. Carson 422, 5. Fallon 453, 6. South Tahoe 458, 7. Douglas 467, 8. Wooster 526. Individual scores Manogue: Alex Phillips 85, Maggie Jones 84, Mackenzie Souers 80, Elise Levy 90, Megan Anderson 136, Lexi Robertson 114. Damonte Ranch: Shayla Miller 104, Ashleigh Westover 96, Rachael Schryer 101, Morgan Pisane 118. Galena: Hayley Jensen 100, Skylar Antencio 105, Sydney Atencio 113, Gabi Lucas 109, Rachael Zunino 107, Amanda Parmer 110. Carson: Megan Justice 113, Whitney Nash 102, Elayna Shine 105, Katie Cowperthwaite 110, Lindsay Burroughs 105, Katie Livermore 110. Fallon: Megan Hill 109, Brittyn Tidwell 103, Sarah Frandsen 123, Sara Parsons 118, Ashley Bowers 128, Katie Moore 131. South Tahoe: Alexis Holmes 82, Morgan Murphy 92, Brittany Rumble 118. Douglas: Bethany Wurster 75, Kelsey Endter 118, Megan Welch 151, Bri Burnside 138, Emily Downer 136, Kristen Greenhut 153. Wooster: Alana Crosby 123, Zoie Oberg 116, Karlee Day 130, Samantha Burrows 157.

Trafficking charge dropped in Gomez case

The most serious charge against David Gomez, 22, of Gardnerville was dismissed Wednesday when a co-defendant in the case said he would rather stay in jail than testify against the suspect. Justice Richard Glasson, sitting in for Justice Jim EnEarl, ordered Marshall Wright to remain in jail until he is willing to answer questions about his dealings with Gomez, who had been charged with trafficking in a controlled substance. Wright, 22, invoked the Fifth Amendment against self-incrimination even though the he’d been advised he didn’t qualify for the constitutional protection because he already pleaded guilty to trafficking in a controlled substance. “The court directs you and orders you to answer the questions,” Glasson said. After Wright refused, Glasson said he would be jailed until he complied. “It could be years in jail,” Glasson said. “Could be,” said Wright. He refused to testify last week against Gomez and proceedings were delayed until Wright’s court-appointed lawyer, Alan Erb, could be present in court. Wright maintained his silence and declined an opportunity to talk with Erb who attended Wednesday’s court hearing. “Marshall Wright is more afraid of David Gomez than he is of prison,” said prosecutor Dina Salvucci after the hearing. Without Wright’s direct testimony, Glasson ruled as hearsay testimony from Douglas County Sheriff’s Investigator Brian Johnson about a transaction allegedly involving Gomez and Wright that took place March 15. Wright, 22, was arrested March 15 on five felony charges of trafficking and possession of a controlled substance after allegedly selling 3 ounces of methamphetamine to an undercover informant. In a plea agreement, five charges were dropped and he is to be sentenced Tuesday on the remaining charge. Wright is in Douglas County Jail on $100,000 bail. Gomez also is in Douglas County Jail. Although Glasson dropped the felony charge, Gomez faces five misdemeanors including possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, making annoying, threatening or obscene telephone calls, harassment or threats and interfering with emergency communications. When Gomez was arrested April 24, deputies allegedly found marijuana, a smoking pipe and a roach clip. Gomez was accused of making threats against a neighbor and his parents. Glasson left Gomez’s bail at $26,000 cash only pending his next court appearance May 25 on the misdemeanors. If he bails out, Gomez is forbidden to live with any family members or have contact with the people he is accused of threatening. He is subject to random search and seizure and must abstain from alcohol and drugs. Gomez would be under the supervision of the alternative sentencing department. Investigator Johnson testified last week that on March 14 deputies observed Gomez arrive at Wright’s residence and leave after a few minutes. They saw Gomez return to his home in Bodie Flats, then back to Wright’s. They arrested Wright as he sat on a bench at Lampe Park. According to Johnson, Wright said Gomez had paid him $5 to deliver 13.6 grams of methamphetamine to a woman. Johnson testified that Wright said Gomez was the source of the methamphetamine. At his arraignment April 4 before District Judge Michael Gibbons, Wright said he was finished with drugs. “I am only 22. I just got married,” he said. “This time, I am stupidly scared straight. I’m done. I want to go home and get a job.” Wright faces up to six years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Gibbons said at the arraignment he was surprised that five of six felony charges had been dismissed, but he assumed the agreement was based on Wright’s willingness to co-operate with law enforcement. Two other people have pleaded guilty to charges that tied them to Gomez. Chante Redfox Martinez, identified by deputies as Gomez’s girlfriend, pleaded guilty to making a false criminal report. She received a suspended 180-day jail sentence. Michael Wright, Marshall’s father, pleaded guilty Tuesday in District Court to being an accessory after a felony crime is committed. He is to be sentenced June 28 and faces up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. He admitted giving Gomez a ride on April 24 and knowing that Gomez was wanted by authorities. “I didn’t know the extent of the trouble he was in,” Michael Wright said Tuesday. I did know it had to do with drugs.” Gomez was the subject of a six-week search and a $500 reward offered by Secret Witness. — Sheila Gardner can be reached at sgardner@recordcourier.com or 782-5121, ext. 214.

Fugitive captured after K-9 bites arm

Fugitive David Gomez, one of Douglas County's most wanted felons, was captured Friday in Antioch, Calif., after he was bitten by a K-9 service dog while trying to elude arrest. Sgt. Pat Brooks said Monday that Gomez, 31, was apprehended in a joint effort with the U.S. Marshals Service and the Antioch Police Department. Gomez, wanted for drug trafficking, has eluded capture since he failed to appear for an Oct. 1 Douglas County District Court date. In February DCSO deputies surrounded an address at 641 Thorobred Ave., in Ruhenstroth, but did not locate Gomez. Brooks said Monday that Gomez was believed to be staying with friends of his girlfriend. "Working with U.S. Marshals, they were able to get some information in Antioch and found his vehicle there. They did some surveillance, and knew he was likely to be a runner, so they set up a perimeter," Brooks said. Brooks said Gomez attempted to flee Friday, but was arrested by Antioch police after he was bitten on the right arm by a K-9 service dog. Brooks said he was treated at a nearby hospital and remanded into custody where he is being held without bail. Gomez is expected to be extradited to Nevada after proceedings in California. Antioch is located in Contra Costa County in the East Bay region. Last October, while out of custody, Gomez left the Minden courthouse just before the proceedings where he was being arraigned on charges of trafficking, habitual felon and possession of a dangerous weapon. Gomez was arrested in May 2013 after he ran from deputies trying to serve a warrant for a probation violation. When he was taken into custody, deputies reportedly found 27.9 grams of methamphetamine, empty plastic bags, a switchblade, a pay notebook and $457. Gomez has a lengthy criminal history and multiple failures to appear. He spent 3-1/2 years in prison before being released in November 2012. Gomez has served two prior prison terms for selling methamphetamine, and eluding a peace officer who believed Gomez was trying to run him over with a van.

Trafficking charge dropped in Gardnerville drug case

The most serious charge against David Gomez, 22, of Gardnerville was dismissed Wednesday when a co-defendant in the case said he would rather stay in jail than testify against the suspect. Justice Richard Glasson, sitting in for Justice Jim EnEarl, ordered Marshall Wright to remain in jail until he is willing to answer questions about his dealings with Gomez, who had been charged with trafficking in a controlled substance. Wright, 22, invoked the Fifth Amendment against self-incrimination even though he’d been advised he didn’t qualify for the constitutional protection because he already pleaded guilty to trafficking in a controlled substance. “The court directs you and orders you to answer the questions,” Glasson said. After Wright refused, Glasson said he would be jailed until he complied. “It could be years in jail,” Glasson said. “Could be,” said Wright. He refused to testify last week against Gomez and proceedings were delayed until Wright’s court-appointed lawyer, Alan Erb, could be present in court. Wright maintained his silence and declined an opportunity to talk with Erb who attended Wednesday’s court hearing. “Marshall Wright is more afraid of David Gomez than he is of prison,” said prosecutor Dina Salvucci after the hearing. Without Wright’s direct testimony, Glasson ruled as hearsay testimony from Douglas County Sheriff’s Investigator Brian Johnson about a transaction allegedly involving Gomez and Wright that took place March 15. Wright, 22, was arrested March 15 on five felony charges of trafficking and possession of a controlled substance after allegedly selling 3 ounces of methamphetamine to an undercover informant. In a plea agreement, five charges were dropped and he is to be sentenced Tuesday on the remaining charge. Wright is in Douglas County Jail on $100,000 bail. Gomez also is in Douglas County Jail. Although Glasson dropped the felony charge, Gomez faces five misdemeanors including possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, making annoying, threatening or obscene telephone calls, harassment or threats and interfering with emergency communications. When Gomez was arrested April 24, deputies allegedly found marijuana, a smoking pipe and a roach clip. Gomez was accused of making threats against a neighbor and his parents. Glasson left Gomez’s bail at $26,000 cash only pending his next court appearance May 25 on the misdemeanors. If he bails out, Gomez is forbidden to live with any family members or have contact with the people he is accused of threatening. He is subject to random search and seizure and must abstain from alcohol and drugs. Gomez would be under the supervision of the alternative sentencing department. Investigator Johnson testified last week that on March 14 deputies observed Gomez arrive at Wright’s residence and leave after a few minutes. They saw Gomez return to his home in Bodie Flats, then back to Wright’s. They arrested Wright as he sat on a bench at Lampe Park. According to Johnson, Wright said Gomez had paid him $5 to deliver 13.6 grams of methamphetamine to a woman. Johnson testified that Wright said Gomez was the source of the methamphetamine. At his arraignment April 4 before District Judge Michael Gibbons, Wright said he was finished with drugs. “I am only 22. I just got married,” he said. “This time, I am stupidly scared straight. I’m done. I want to go home and get a job.” Wright faces up to six years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Gibbons said at the arraignment he was surprised that five of six felony charges had been dismissed, but he assumed the agreement was based on Wright’s willingness to co-operate with law enforcement. Two other people have pleaded guilty to charges that tied them to Gomez. Chante Redfox Martinez, identified by deputies as Gomez’s girlfriend, pleaded guilty to making a false criminal report. She received a suspended 180-day jail sentence. Michael Wright, Marshall’s father, pleaded guilty Tuesday in District Court to being an accessory after a felony crime is committed. He is to be sentenced June 28 and faces up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine. He admitted giving Gomez a ride on April 24 and knowing that Gomez was wanted by authorities. “I didn’t know the extent of the trouble he was in,” Michael Wright said Tuesday. I did know it had to do with drugs.” Gomez was the subject of a six-week search and a $500 reward offered by Secret Witness. — Sheila Gardner can be reached at sgardner@recordcourier.com or 782-5121, ext. 214.