Girls’ Golf: Wurster wins third league tournament | RecordCourier.com

Girls’ Golf: Wurster wins third league tournament

STATELINE – Even though Bethany Wurster represents Douglas High School and Alexis Holmes plays for South Tahoe High, they are more like golf teammates. As good “teammates” do, Wurster and Holmes root for one aonother and inspire each other. For two of the top golfers in the Sierra Division, and the state for that matter, a friendship has formed out of competition. “It will fuel you to strive for something better. You just want to beat them. You love them, but you want to beat them at the same time,” Wurster said Tuesday afternoon following a 3-over-par round of 75 that topped the Sierra Division event at Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course. “It’s kind of like, ‘Oh, I hope you do well, but I hope I do better.’” Wurster, who birdied six holes, finished seven strokes ahead of Holmes, who came in third with an 82. The last of Wurster’s birdies on No. 18 cost Holmes a dinner. “Once I get my scoring figured out, it’s going to be fun,” said Holmes, who believes mismanagement of her game at times prevents her from scoring in the 70s. “I’m driving the ball really well, but I’m just hitting bad irons. I overcompenstate sometimes when I shouldn’t, so I’m 20 yards long, and it’s very difficult to two-putt from there. “Hopefully by zone I’ll get it figured out.” The two friends played Edgewood Tahoe on Sunday in preparation for Tuesday’s round, and Wurster beat Holmes 74-76 by eagling the final hole. Bishop Manogue’s Mackenzie Souers broke up the 1-2 Wurster-Holmes finish by shooting an 80. Alex Phillips, the defending state champion and also playing in the group with Wurster and Holmes, came in fifth with an 85. “It’s the first time all three have played together,” said STHS coach Marsha Butler. “Bethany and Alexis have developed a really good friendship, but they are always real competitive with each other.” Manogue, the defending state champions, were far superior than their division foes on Tuesday, as four Miners scored 90 or better en route to a 339 team total. Damonte Ranch was second with 419 strokes and Galena and Carson tied for third at 422. South Tahoe, which placed third in the previous tournament, finished sixth at 458. The Vikings’ Morgan Murphy shot 109 and Brittany Rumble fired a 118. Team scores 1. Manogue 439, 2. Damonte Ranch 419, 3. Galena 422, 3. Carson 422, 5. Fallon 453, 6. South Tahoe 458, 7. Douglas 467, 8. Wooster 526. Individual scores Manogue: Alex Phillips 85, Maggie Jones 84, Mackenzie Souers 80, Elise Levy 90, Megan Anderson 136, Lexi Robertson 114. Damonte Ranch: Shayla Miller 104, Ashleigh Westover 96, Rachael Schryer 101, Morgan Pisane 118. Galena: Hayley Jensen 100, Skylar Antencio 105, Sydney Atencio 113, Gabi Lucas 109, Rachael Zunino 107, Amanda Parmer 110. Carson: Megan Justice 113, Whitney Nash 102, Elayna Shine 105, Katie Cowperthwaite 110, Lindsay Burroughs 105, Katie Livermore 110. Fallon: Megan Hill 109, Brittyn Tidwell 103, Sarah Frandsen 123, Sara Parsons 118, Ashley Bowers 128, Katie Moore 131. South Tahoe: Alexis Holmes 82, Morgan Murphy 92, Brittany Rumble 118. Douglas: Bethany Wurster 75, Kelsey Endter 118, Megan Welch 151, Bri Burnside 138, Emily Downer 136, Kristen Greenhut 153. Wooster: Alana Crosby 123, Zoie Oberg 116, Karlee Day 130, Samantha Burrows 157.

Lawsuit: Labor chief letting employers cheat workers

A complaint filed in Carson District Court charges that the labor commissioner is letting employers cheat minimum-wage workers. The suit by lawyers Don Springmeyer and Brad Schrager of Las Vegas says the regulations implementing Nevada's voter-approved minimum wage law illegally let those employers pay workers a dollar an hour less than they should. The action was filed on behalf of Cody Hancock and Kwok Yen Moy, two workers in Southern Nevada. It asks for a court order throwing out the offending regulations and directing the commissioner to put in new rules following the intent of the constitutional amendment. That amendment approved in 2006 set an inflation-indexed minimum wage that is now $7.25 an hour if the employer provides health insurance to workers but $8.25 an hour if the employer doesn't provide health insurance. That health insurance was to be no more than 10 percent of the employee's wage. According to the complaint, the "overriding error" in the regulations is the commissioners ruling that, "if an employee declined health insurance coverage, for whatever reason, the employer could pay the employee at the reduced minimum wage rate." They argued that ruling completely violated the intent of the amendment, "as the greatest fiscal advantage to the employer would be to offer but not provide employees the low-premium, comprehensive health insurance benefits mandated (by the amendment)." At the same time, the regulations allow the employer to add tip income to the calculated wages, which in some cases sharply raised the amount workers could be made to pay for a health plan. And that, they argued, "rendered employers offering more expensive plans than the constitutional amendment contemplated eligible to pay their workers at the reduced minimum wage rate." "Nevada law does not permit a tip credit against minimum wage levels," they charged. The combination of regulations, they say, "allows employers to pay employees at the lower minimum wage rate based upon merely having offered health insurance benefit plans at calculated premium cost … higher than is permitted (by the amendment)." In addition, the complaint says the labor commissioner maintains no list of employers eligible to pay the lower wage, collects no data on the health plans they allegedly offer and no list of employees who are or have been paid the lower rate. The violations, they argue, are cheating thousands of minimum-wage workers in Nevada and have been for the past seven years since the amendment was passed. It asks the court to bar the labor commissioner from enforcing the regulations and order the commissioner to implement regulations that comply with what the voters approved as part of the state Constitution.

Suit: Labor chief letting employers cheat workers

A complaint filed in Carson District Court charges that the Labor commissioner is letting employers cheat minimum-wage workers. The suit by lawyers Don Springmeyer and Brad Schrager of Las Vegas says the regulations implementing Nevada's voter-approved minimum wage law illegally let those employers pay workers a dollar an hour less than they should. The action was filed on behalf of Cody Hancock and Kwok Yen Moy, two workers in Southern Nevada. It asks for a court order throwing out the offending regulations and directing the commissioner to put in new rules following the intent of the constitutional amendment. That amendment approved in 2006 set an inflation-indexed minimum wage that is now $7.25 an hour if the employer provides health insurance to workers but $8.25 an hour if the employer doesn't provide health insurance. That health insurance was to be no more than 10 percent of the employee's wage. According to the complaint, the "overriding error" in the regulations is the commissioners ruling that, "if an employee declined health insurance coverage, for whatever reason, the employer could pay the employee at the reduced minimum wage rate." They argued that ruling completely violated the intent of the amendment, "as the greatest fiscal advantage to the employer would be to offer but not provide employees the low-premium, comprehensive health insurance benefits mandated (by the amendment)." At the same time, the regulations allow the employer to add tip income to the calculated wages, which in some cases sharply raised the amount workers could be made to pay for a health plan. And that, they argued, "rendered employers offering more expensive plans than the constitutional amendment contemplated eligible to pay their workers at the reduced minimum wage rate." "Nevada law does not permit a tip credit against minimum wage levels," they charged. The combination of regulations, they say, "allows employers to pay employees at the lower minimum wage rate based upon merely having offered health insurance benefit plans at calculated premium cost … higher than is permitted (by the amendment)." In addition, the complaint says the Labor commissioner maintains no list of employers eligible to pay the lower wage, collects no data on the health plans they allegedly offer and no list of employees who are or have been paid the lower rate. The violations, they argue, are cheating thousands of minimum-wage workers in Nevada and have been for the past seven years since the amendment was passed. It asks the court to bar the Labor commissioner from enforcing the regulations and order the commissioner to implement regulations that comply with what the voters approved as part of the state Constitution.

Minimum wage stirs debate Nevada Legislature

It was dueling statistics last week as backers and opponents of raising the minimum wage debated the merits of a bill that would increase it to $15 an hour over the next few years. Sponsor William McCurdy II, D-Las Vegas, told the Commerce and Labor Committee AB175 would reduce employee turnover, increase productivity and provide workers with a living wage. He and Paul Sonn, general counsel for the Employee Wage Project, said statistics show that concerns raising the wage would cost thousands of jobs and put businesses out of work are wrong and haven't shown up in cities that have raised minimum wages, including Seattle and San Francisco. But opponents from a number of business organizations and the state's two major chambers of commerce said there are provable job losses in those cities. And a number of businessmen turned out to say they simply can't afford to pay more than the $7.25 an hour current minimum wage in Nevada. The bill would raise the minimum wage $1.25 an hour each year until it hits $15 an hour — $14 an hour for those businesses that provide health benefits to workers. After that, the wage would be indexed to inflation. McCurdy said the data he has seen says the vast majority of those workers aren't teens in part-time jobs — many are older with families to support. He said $7.25 an hour just isn't a livable wage. "There are hundreds of economists on one side and hundreds on the other," said Warren Hardy, representing the restaurant association. "What I know is you put two economists in a room and you'll get three opinions." Sonn testified there's a "substantial body of research the lion's share —— when this is gradually phased in, as most of these are — there is very little effect on employment levels, little adverse effect on jobs." He said there were some effects on fast food and other restaurants because labor costs are a much greater portion of their overall costs. Phillip Kaiser, a Washoe County teacher, said many of the teens he teaches are "helping keep their families afloat through minimum wage jobs." And he argued all taxpayers are subsidizing minimum wage workers who have to use public support programs ranging from food stamps to welfare and Medicaid. Megan Lewis of Reno said when her mother left her at age 15, she had to "couch hop" and work at minimum wage jobs, leaving school to earn a GED while working overtime. She said many of those homeless in Reno have jobs and work 40 hours a week and "should not have to live in poverty." "Those jobs are not paying them enough to survive," she said. Opponents charged raising minimum wage rates kills jobs. Elliot Malin of Americans for Prosperity Nevada said just 2.5 percent of Nevada's working population over age 16 earns minimum wages. He said half of minimum wage earners are under 25. Paul Maratkin of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Chamber said the bill doesn't even consider associated costs including higher Modified Business Taxes, unemployment compensation and worker's comp payments businesses would have to pay. And Bryan Wachter of the Nevada Retail Association said contrary to what supporters say, Seattle lost thousands of jobs because of its $15 an hour minimum wage rate. He said many companies simply moved out of the Seattle city limits to avoid the higher wages. After restaurant officials said they often work on just a percent or two profit margin, Assemblywoman Maggie Carlton, D-Las Vegas, said she has been in the restaurant business some 30 years and those numbers don't hold up. She said one major restaurant chaincharges just one penny less for an order of chicken wings — in a state where the minimum is $2.13 an hour — than it does in Nevada. The committee took no action on AB175.

Douglas final basketball season statistics

Record: 23-9 overall, 11-3 Sierra League, 8-2 home, 8-1 away, 7-6 neutral Team Statistics Points for: 2,113 Points against: 1,767 3-pointers for: 114 3-pointers against: 121 Free throws for: 383-610 Free throws against: 345-527 Field goals for: 879 Field goals against: 633 Scoring by quarters Douglas 486 509 545 565 8 – 2,113 Opponent 402 413 457 492 3 – 1,767 Individual statistics *Keith Olson 203 71-116 477 *Mike Gransbery 133 49-66 386 *Jeff Nady 92 59-90 248 James McLaughlin 78 28-49 200 *Kevin Emm 74 27-42 194 Joe Nady 76 21-34 177 David Laird 55 46-62 156 *Nate Whalin 27 5-16 59 Jared Trowbridge 10 33-47 55 Ryan McPeek 16 17-32 50 Brandon Bernard 7 12-19 27 Herman Fillmore 4 11-16 19 Ross Bertolone 8 2-12 18 *- Starters 3-pointers Mike Gransbery 72 Kevin Emm 18 James McLaughlin 17 Joe Nady 4 Keith Olson 2 Brandon Bernard 1 Ryan McPeek 1 Fouled out Jeff Nady 4 Joe Nady 4 James McLaughlin 2 Kevin Emm 2 Keith Olson 1 David Laird 1 Nate Whalin 1 Record: 14-17 overall, 8-6 Sierra League, 5-3 home, 5-6 away, 4-7 neutral TEAM Points for: 1,353 Points against: 1,297 INDIVIDUAL SCORING *Jessica Waggoner 370 *Bridget Maestretti 173 Dana Pardee 149 *Taryn Williams 107 (from 12/27) *Dany Heidt 71 *Sarah Hartley 70 Nicole Didero 29 Katie Buffo 20 Allie Hughes 18 Kaela Horse 18 Michelle Richardson 12 Lisa Christen 8 Kristin Wyatt 6 Gina Pfaffenberger 2 * – Starters

Tiger golf takes 4th place

Freshman Michele Nikkels continued her successful rookie season, shooting a 100 to lead the Douglas girls’ golf team to a fourth-place finish at Rosewood Lakes Golf Course Wednesday. Reno’s Alyson Felesina took first overall with a 79 and Melissa Slocumb shot an 81 to take second for the Huskies. Reno won the match as a team, shooting a 442. For Douglas, Sarah Schonian shot a 113 and Kristin Wyatt shot a 114. Jolie Kizer shot a 118, Shelby Louie shot a 129 and Alyssa Matus shot a 131 to round out the Tigers’ afternoon.

Minimum wage, overtime rates won’t increase this year

The Office of the Labor Commissioner has released the annual bulletins for Nevada's minimum wage and daily overtime requirements that will take effect July 1. The rates for the upcoming year will remain unchanged from last year. The minimum wage for employees who are offered qualified health benefits from their employers will remain at $7.25 per hour and the minimum wage for employees who are not offered health benefits will remain $8.25 per hour. The 2006 Minimum Wage Amendment to the Nevada Constitution requires the minimum wage to be recalculated each year based on increases in the federal minimum wage or if greater by the cumulative increase in the cost of living. The rate for daily overtime will also remain the same because the minimum wage rate isn't changing. Nevada is one of a few states with a daily overtime requirement in addition to the requirement to pay overtime for more than 40 hours in a workweek. Employees who are offered qualified health benefits from their employers and earn less than $10.875 per hour, and employees earning less than $12.375 per hour who are not offered qualified health benefits must be paid overtime whenever they work more than 8 hours in a 24-hour period. Employees that are exempt from overtime under Nevada state law are not subject to these requirements. Additional information regarding the minimum wage and daily overtime rates is available from the Office of the Labor Commissioner: 775-684-1890, Carson City. The annual bulletins containing the rates are available online from the Office of the Labor Commissioner's website at http://www.labor.nv.gov or in hard copy form by request to the Office of the Labor Commissioner.

Golf: Wurster wins third regional title in four years

SPARKS – It was a huge day for Carson Valley golfers Tuesday afternoon at the NIAA 4A Regional Golf Championships at Red Hawk. Carson High’s girls golf team reached the state tournament for the first time in coach Terry Gingell’s eight-year tenure as head coach, and Douglas High’s Bethany Wurster won the 4A regional individual title for the third time in four years. Spanish Springs won the team title with a 36-hole total of 684, including a 338 on Tuesday. Carson was next with a 714, which included a 360 after an opening-round 354. Bishop Manogue was third at 726. Wurster won the individual title with a 151, five shots better than Tess Jones of Spanish Springs. McQueen’s Kelsey Roberts was third with a 159. “Bethany kept her focus and was able to pull off her third regional title,” Douglas coach Steve Gustafson said. “She struggled a bit the second day. There were some tough pin placements, a little wind, and the pressure from Tess Jones. “At one point, they were dead even. Bethany carded a birdie on sixteen, which gave her the motivation needed to finish strong.” Douglas finished fifth as a team (763) behind Reno. “As a team, they played better than any coach could ask,” Gustafson said. “We were not the strongest team in the field, but the kids shot their season bests. “Fifth place was quite an accomplishment for this team. We didn’t have a lot of experienced players, besides Bethany, most of our girls started playing within the past year.” Tawnie Wentz took 16th (95-91-186), Molly Jordan was 37th (107-106-213), Emily Gosselin was 39th (105-110-215), Megan Welch was 41st (113-108-221) and Devyn Hotho was 47th (119-113-232) for Douglas.

Heck: Trump will not be nominee

Rep. Joe Heck, R-Nv., said Wednesday he hasn't chosen a presidential candidate to back just yet but the Republican nominee won't be Donald Trump. In an interview in Carson City, Heck, who's running for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Harry Reid, said the field of 17 candidates offers the GOP "an embarrassment of riches" with several good choices. Because of that, he said he'll wait for the second debate in September before deciding who he will back. Heck is expected to be in Gardnerville on Saturday for Adam Laxalt's Basque Fry at the Corley Ranch. On the subject of Yucca Mountain, Heck said the 1984 law "is still the law" and the process it laid out is still in place. "We've got to let the process run its course," he said. "If it's determined that it's not safe, it's done." But he said if the federal government determines the planned repository is safe, there's little Nevada can do to block it from opening. "If the federal government says it's coming, it's coming," he said. Asked whether the federal government should defund Planned Parenthood, he said many of the health services the group provides are vital. "As a physician, a husband and father of two daughters, it's critical to me that we take care of women's health issues," he said. But Heck said the organization claims just 3 percent of it's business is related to abortion. "Why not give up the abortion services and continue to provide the critical services," he said. Heck said he supports medical marijuana but is "reluctant to support legalization of recreational marijuana." "I've sponsored federal legislation to legalize medical marijuana," he said. But he said the problem with legalizing recreational pot is the inability for law enforcement to quickly and accurately test whether a driver is stoned. He made it clear he doesn't think the federal government should get into the battle over the minimum wage. "That should be left to localities," he said. "My goal as Senator is to give (people) opportunities." Heck said providing jobs for people who have the potential for good workers to move up the ladder and above minimum wage is what's important and states and locals should decide what the minimum wage is for their area. He said he has been meeting with businessmen around the state — including in Carson City — to get their input on how to create those opportunities.

2014 Primary Election results

Congress District 2 — Democrat Douglas District *Kristen Spees 540 8,205 Brian Dempsey 563 6,799 Vance Alm 233 3,221 Ed Lee 185 3,163 Governor — Democrat Douglas State * None of these 526 21,718 Bob Goodman 213 17,950 Stephen Frye 252 8,229 John Rutledge 260 6,038 Charlie Chang 100 5,617 Chris Hyepock 131 4,740 Allen Rheinhart 96 3,605 Abduyl Shabazz 260 2,730 Frederick Conquest 35 1,866 Governor — Republican *Brian Sandoval 6,096 105,826 Eddie Hamilton 115 3,758 None of these 198 3,508 William Tarbell 81 1,966 Thomas Tighe 66 1,495 Gary Marinch 39 1,195 Lieutenant Governor — Democrat *Lucy Flores 1,112 52,305 None of these 339 11,508 Harley Kulkin 198 9,366 Lieutenant Governor — Republican *Mark Hutchison 3,953 62,920 Sue Lowden 1,912 42,280 Chris Dyer 359 6,824 None of these 345 5,008 State Controller — Republican Douglas State *Ron Knecht 4,562 56,480 Barry Herr 519 20,815 Cort R. Arlint 440 14,734 None of these 738 15,420 State Assembly District 39 — Republican Douglas District *Jim Wheeler 4,037 5,070 Robin Reedy 2,443 3,012 Sheriff Douglas *Ron Pierini 6,335 David J. Brady 1,888 Michael T. Gyll 911 District Judge Dept. 1 *Tod Young 7,643 District Judge Dept. 2 *Michael Gibbbons 7,817 School Board Area 2 *Robbe Lehmann 7,182 School Board Area 6 *Thomas Moore 7,182 School Board Area 7 *Ross Chichester 7,564