by Sheila Gardner

Back to: Crime News
May 14, 2013
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Man gets probation for thefts

A 20-year-old man who pleaded guilty to stealing two dirt bikes from a Gardnerville Ranchos garage was sentenced Tuesday to probation and warned he would go to prison if he was caught drinking a sip of beer or taking a hit of marijuana.

District Judge Tod Young told Taylor Monge he would keep the option of sending the defendant to a prison-run regimental discipline program “in my pocket” to see how well he does on probation.

Sentencing was delayed until May 28 for codefendant Brian Ray Hearold, 19, who was charged Friday with statutory sexual seduction for having sex in April with a 14-year-old girl while he was out of custody. He is back in Douglas County Jail.

They faced up to five years in prison and a $10,000 fine after each pleaded guilty to stealing two dirt bikes Feb. 20.

According to reports, a resident in the 1300 block of Rancho Road reported a burglary in progress on Bluerock shortly after 10 p.m. Feb. 20.

The witness said he noticed three males loading what appeared to be a motorcycle into the truck and heard one man say, “Hurry up.”

Shortly after midnight, a deputy noticed three subjects in the parking lot of the Tillman Lane 7-Eleven, one pushing a dirt bike.

Monge and Hearold were arrested shortly after the incident, and the property was recovered.

Monge was released on Tuesday with credit for 63 days in custody.

His lawyer, Jamie Henry, asked Young for probation, admitting her client made a “stupid mistake” smoking marijuana when he was out prior to sentencing. Monge was returned to jail following the violation.

“It was not a ‘mistake,’” Young said. “I find that offensive to the court that it was characterized as such. It was a deliberate decision to break the law again when he’s out of jail.”

Henry said Monge realized he made a bad decision.

“He wants to show the court he really wants to do it at this time,” Henry said. “He doesn’t want to be in this life anymore. He’d like to go to college and do something cool like be a psychologist.”

Prosecutor Erik Levin advocated the regimental discipline program, a minimum six-month boot camp designed to keep young offenders out of prison.

“He would learn some tools to control his behavior and deal with these setbacks that happen in life,” Levin said.

“I am sorry for what I did,” Monge said.

“And, what was that?” asked Young.

“By making them scared in their own home,” Monge said.

“You made a child scared in his own home, a little kid,” said the judge.

Monge admitted that he told the arresting officer he was just going to plead guilty because he was destined to spend his life behind bars, and that he had no family.

Young made Monge turn around and look at supporters who showed up for his sentencing. He has been living with his grandfather.

“Every court session we’ve had, your grandfather has been here,” Young said. “He doesn’t like coming here.”

Young sentenced Monge to 12-36 months in Nevada state prison, suspended for three years. He ordered him to abstain from controlled substances and alcohol, and to submit to random search and seizure for the presence of drugs, alcohol and stolen items.

He must be employed full time, or in school. He ordered Monge to get a substance abuse evaluation and follow the recommendations.

“You get one life, don’t waste it,” Young said. “It’s precious and you need to treat yourself like you’re precious.”

If you really see your life as spending the rest of it behind bars, you”re not as smart as Ms. Henry says you are.”

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The Record Courier Updated May 23, 2013 05:58PM Published May 14, 2013 01:38PM Copyright 2013 The Record Courier. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.