by Sean Whaley
Nevada News Bureau

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November 30, 2012
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Nevada Republicans support state-issued drivers licenses

Nevada's state Senate Republican leadership on Friday expressed support for a state policy that makes thousands of young immigrants living in Nevada eligible for a state-issued driver's license or ID.

The Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles, with the support of Gov. Brian Sandoval, announced this week that its policy would be to honor the employment authorization card granted to successful applicants under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Deferred Action program.

Senate Minority Leader Michael Roberson, R-Henderson, said he supports the DMV policy and hopes those eligible will take advantage of this opportunity.

"These young men and women are living, working and attending school here in Nevada, and are doing everything in their power to improve their lives and the lives of their families," Roberson said. "A driver's license from the state of Nevada will aid in their ability to commute to and from work and school; will afford a sense of self-sufficiency; and will provide greater opportunities for thousands of Nevada families."

Deferred Action, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals is a directive from the secretary of the DHS that grants temporary permission to stay in the U.S. to certain undocumented young people. Individuals who receive deferred action may apply for and obtain employment authorization. It is estimated that more than 20,000 young immigrants could benefit from this program in Nevada.

Sen. Ben Kieckhefer, R-Reno, also applauded the policy: "This DMV policy allowing young immigrants living in our communities to obtain driver's licenses will benefit not only the young people and families eligible for deferred action, but will also help strengthen Nevada's education system and our economy at large."

Sen. Joe Hardy, R-Boulder City, commented on the safety aspects of the policy: "In order to secure a driver's license, an individual must obtain the proper knowledge and skill level to pass a test to ensure they can safely drive on the streets. This policy will not only provide greater opportunity for so many young people in Nevada, it will also make our streets safer by ensuring training for those who may otherwise be driving without a license or adequate preparation."

The Las Vegas Sun reported the drivers' license policy earlier this week.

Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano on June 15 announced that effective immediately, certain young people who were brought to the United States as young children, do not present a risk to national security or public safety, and meet several key criteria, would be considered for relief from removal from the country or from entering into removal proceedings.

Napolitano said the deferred action program will offer the young immigrants two-year work permits and not deport them as a temporary measure until the country's immigration policies could be changed with the adoption of the DREAM Act.

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The Record Courier Updated Nov 30, 2012 06:42PM Published Nov 30, 2012 06:40PM Copyright 2012 The Record Courier. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.